Sale on canvas prints! Use code ABCXYZ at checkout for a special discount!

Blog

Displaying: 1 - 10 of 113

  |  

Show All

  |

[1]

2 3 4 5 6 Next

The Incarnation - illustration from 1997

December 23rd, 2019

The Incarnation - illustration from 1997

The Incarnation : illustration from 1997
“There it was - the true Light coming into the world, the genuine, perfect, steadfast Light that illumines every person...” The Gospel of St. John 1:9 (from the Amplified Bible)
I can’t remember now if it was a poem or an article I was asked by America Magazine to illustrate in November 1997. But I do remember that my Father, Stephen McNichols (7 March 1914 - 25 November 1997) was slowly fading into the Light, inside a hospital in Denver at that time. I had flown in from NYC the 24th and was sitting by his bedside, talking with him about everything, while doing this illustration because I had a deadline. He was very peaceful and it did not seem to me at all, that he would die in the early hours of the 25th. So Dad will always be connected to this illustration of The Incarnation. In it I imagined the hand of God the Father lighting a candle of The Light of the World and the Child being the Light coming down from Heaven inside the flame. Sometimes you do things in a way that people call “being in the zone” or almost completely directed by the unconscious imagination. But I like to believe the Holy Spirit who sees all things, including the exact situation you are in at that moment, guides your heart and hand to produce an image that mysteriously ministers to you, and also goes out into the world as something that is a contemplation for others to feel inside their souls too. For me this has become an image of the beginning of a life that would dramatically change all history, all of creation, and point to the night of the end of life on earth, and into the life of Eternity. This is how it is with all of us. We have this brief life here but we will live forever. I have felt both my Father and Mother’s hands still lighting my life, with the beautiful examples of their lives, and their steadfast love. But most of all, I think we all remember our parents,siblings, friends, large or small extended families, with great love, and if need be, the lovely generosity of forgiveness during this Holy Season of Advent and Christmas.
Fr Bill McNichols:the fourth week of Advent 2019

The Feminine Name of God - Shekhinah

December 23rd, 2019

The Feminine Name of God - Shekhinah

The Feminine Name of God : Shekhinah
“....here is the deepest secret nobody knows...and this is the wonder that’s keeping the stars apart
I carry your heart (I carry it in my heart)”
e e cummings 1952
“We may well prefer the dark secret of our own existence to the whole range of this purely economic glory of God, i.e. to the unknown quantity, the inscrutable being who is concealed by it. But in the end it would be deadly for faith if God were not the God of Glory...In His manifestations God presents Himself as one who dwells, one who descends, one who comes and goes and finally, as a fellow-traveler...YHWH descends in the form of fire...the pillar of cloud...at the consecration of the tabernacle, the glory descends definitively to abide (shakan, whence shekina) within the camp (Exodus 33,35,40).”
from “The Glory of the Lord: Volume 6” by
Holy Theologian Cardinal Hans Urs von Balthasar (1905-1988)
Here we go. This blog may seem like a list of a whole lot of books, but I don’t know how to introduce you to Shekhinah in any other way, except to invite you on a prayerful, loving pilgrimage. Also, there is another clearly written explanation of this Hebrew calligraphy by Professor John Dadosky, in the book, “Image to Insight.”
In the early 90’s while I was just beginning my six year apprenticeship of iconography with the Russian American Master Iconographer, Friar Robert Lentz, OFM, I slowly read through all the volumes of “The Glory of the Lord.” I had been introduced to von Balthasar at age 19 by our Novice Master, Fr Vincent O’Flaherty, who had us read the book “Prayer” by the great theologian, and later reintroduced to him, and the mystic Adrienne von Speyr, by my deceased friend, Fr Eddie Oakes, who happened to be writing his truly amazing and holy book on von Balthasar, in the late 80’s, called “Pattern of Redemption” while I was living with him at the 98th Street Jesuit Community in New York City.
But it was later, in Albuquerque , in Volume 6 that I first came across the word, shekina. This led to a journey I’m still on, or a ‘condition’ of sitting inside this mystery, and feeling, or sensing something almost indescribable. Then, when I met Rabbi Leah Novick, after reading her scholarly, beautiful book, “On the Wings of Shekhinah : Rediscovering Judaism’s Divine Feminine” I think I gradually gained more and more understanding. But like the feminine concept of Hagia Sophia or Holy Wisdom, throughout the five Wisdom Books In Scripture (see Kathleen O’Connor’s book, “The Wisdom Literature” and the brilliant “Sophia : the Hidden Christ of Thomas Merton” by Christopher Pramuk) I understood there are somethings that simply cannot be apprehended by the mind, but must be sought in the heart of loving prayer, and often ask, like Icons, for a kind of distance or respectful patience, and as with the Most Blessed Trinity, always remain a holy mystery. As much as I try to describe this pilgrimage to seek and find Shekhinah, it’s like trying to see or explain the Holy Spirit. Yet, I do feel the presence of Shekhinah descend in a palpable way, in late November and during Advent, and reach “Her zenith” on Christmas Eve. As Marcellus says in Shakespeare’s “Hamlet,” that “Some say that ever ‘gainst that season comes, wherein our Saviour’s birth is celebrated, this bird of dawning singeth all night long; and then, they say, no spirit dare stir abroad, the nights are so wholesome,then no planets strike, no fairy takes, nor witch hath power to charm, so hallow’d and so gracious is the time.” I think we used to refer to this sensation as the “Christmas Spirit,” but as I got a better sense of Shekhinah I believe it is this mystery of the Feminine presence of God. I also believe you can feel this presence too if you become aware of the existence of this beautiful mystery, of one more way, as von Balthasar says, of the manifestations of God, “who descends definitively to abide,” as God with us.
“O Come, O Come, Thou Dayspring, come and cheer, our spirits by Thine Advent here. Disperse the gloomy clouds of night, and death’s dark shadow put to flight. Rejoice, Rejoice! O Israel, to thee shall come Emmanuel.”
Fr Bill McNichols for the first week of Advent 2019

La Gloriosa Venida de Cristo Rey- The Glorious Coming of Christ the King

December 23rd, 2019

La Gloriosa Venida de Cristo Rey- The Glorious Coming of Christ the King

La Gloriosa Venida de Cristo Rey (The Glorious Coming of Christ the King)
“For as lightning flashes and lights up the sky from one side to another, so will the Son of Man be in His day.” Luke 17:24
St John Paul II’s inspiration to call the “kairos time” of his papacy “the New Advent”, appeared at the beginning of his first encyclical “Redemptor Hominis,” 2 March 1979. Two years earlier, in 1977 Holy Theologian William Stringfellow had written two articles of great power, wisdom, and Biblical insight about how we are to live as Christians in this time of the Second Advent of the Lord. Apparitions of the Mother of God since the time of the ones given to St Catherine Laboure’ of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal, in Paris 1830, all seem to be calling to us with basically the same heavenly care and message. These include (in our time) Fatima, Portugal, Amsterdam, Holland, Akita, Japan, Medjugorje, Bosnia, and Kibeho, Rwanda; begging for peace among all people, and they all seem to point to the Second Coming of Christ the King. Probably the most dramatic, loving and radiant of these come from Poland, also in our time, to St Faustina Kowalska. The Lord Himself came to Faustina asking for deep trust and devotion to His Divine Mercy; which He said is as “uncountable” as the grains of sand on the beaches near the oceans.
Jesus calls us to be awake with our lights ( the love inside) lit, awaiting Him, who is Our Lord and Bridegroom. All through this time I had wanted to portray the return of Christ the King, and the Jesuits of Santa Clara University gave me this opportunity in 2004. November 24, 2019 is the last Sunday of the Church’s Liturgical Year, and the feast of Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe. If you feel an emptiness or deep deep longing in your heart, during Advent especially, it is probably this ancient prayer of begging for the coming of the Messiah that many holy women and men, like St Simeon and St Anna felt, in the first Advent, portrayed in chapter 2:25-36, in St.Luke’s Gospel.
“Maranatha! Come Lord Jesus!” Revelation 22:20
“Jesus, make my heart like unto Yours, or rather transform it into Your own heart that I may sense the needs of other hearts, especially those who are sad and suffering. May the Rays of Divine Mercy rest in my heart.”
From the Diary of St Faustina Kowalska
Fr Bill McNichols November 2019

Blessed Anne Catherine Emmerich 1774-1824

December 23rd, 2019

Blessed Anne Catherine Emmerich 1774-1824

Blessed Anne Catherine Emmerich 1774-1824
“... Ismeria remained barren for some eighteen years. When she again became pregnant by God’s blessing, I saw that Ismeria was given a revelation at night. She saw an angel beside her bed writing a letter on the wall. It seems to me that it was again that letter M. Ismeria told her husband of it; he also had seen it in his sleep, but now, while awake, they both saw the sign on the wall. After three months Ismeria gave birth to St Anne, who came into the world with that sign on her body.
In her fifth year Anna was, like Our Lady, taken to the school of the Temple, where she remained twelve years. She was brought home again in her seventeenth year...”
Page 18
The Life of the Blessed Virgin Mary by
Blessed Anne Catherine Emmerich
“Anne Catherine Emmerich was told by Our Lord that her gift of seeing the past, present, and future in mystic vision was greater than that possessed by anyone else in history. Born at Flamschen, Westphalia, Germany, on September 8, 1774, she became a nun of the Augustinian Order at Dulmen... From 1802 until her death, she bore the wounds of the Crown of Thorns, and from 1812, the full stigmata of Our Lord, including a cross over her heart and the wound from the lance... Clemens Brentano, a poet, a man of extensive learning and experience, and the literary darling of Europe at that time, went to see Anne Catherine Emmerich on a challenge and never left; rather he returned to the faith and spent the rest of his life transcribing her revelations and preparing them for publication...”
From The Life and Revelations of
Anne Catherine Emmerich
By Carl Schmoger, CSSR
We were always told, actually warned, in school and the seminary, about private revelations. Warned that some “spiritually immature” people would place them above the 4 Gospels and Scripture in general. But also told that we could read them as you would any spiritual writing, life of a saint, theological work, or novel of the Life of Christ etc... as long as you knew these were not the same as Scripture. Some very holy people like the “father of modern poetry,” Gerard Manley Hopkins, have found the revelations of Anne Catherine Emmerich to be a most rewarding source for prayer. As we get closer to Advent I offer this icon of a holy woman to you; an image of her being instructed by the Holy Child Jesus, symbolic of the narratives she was given about the first Advent and the Infancy of “... this child destined for the fall and rising of many...” Luke 2:34. Blessed Anne died at age 49 on 9 February 1824 in Dulmen, Germany.
She was beatified 3 October 2004
by St John Paul II
Dear Blessed Anne
Help us to see into the life of Our Savior
not so much with the gifts you were given, but
with the devotion and love for His Life; a gift available to us all. Then help us take this Light, this beautiful Infant, into a world that daily, expresses its sorrow, tragedies, fear, depression and darkness.
We were all born purposely at this time, for this time, to be Lights. So dear friend, intercede for us to have the zeal and courage to bring all our gifts into the world, especially during this coming season of Advent 2019.
Fr Bill McNichols
18 November, feast of Philippine Duchesne

Holy Bishop St Martin of Tours

December 23rd, 2019

Holy Bishop St Martin of Tours

Holy Bishop St Martin of Tours
“We must obey God, rather than men.” Acts of the Apostles 5:29
“Martin (d.397 CE), named for the Roman god of war, grew up strong and handsome, earning himself a position in the elite Praetorian Guard. But at age 20, he carved up his uniform in order to clothe a freezing beggar. That night, he had a vision of Christ, who proclaimed before the heavenly host; ‘Here is Martin, not even baptized, who has clothed me.’ The very next day, Martin was baptized into the newly legalized Christian religion. He persevered in his reluctant service until it came into conflict with his faith. At the Battle of Worms in 356, he found himself on the eve of war. As Caesar Julian came down the line, he thought of Jesus’ disarming of Peter in Gethsemane. As the most powerful man in the known world stood before him, Martin declared loudly; ‘ I have served as your soldier long enough, let me now serve God; I am a soldier of Christ, it is not lawful for me to fight.’ Christian’s do not pray for victory, but for hostilities to cease. Martin did so behind bars,as a prisoner of conscience, after Caesar jailed him for refusing to fight. However, the enemy negotiated for peace and Martin was discharged from the military; the first soldier saint to escape martyrdom...”
Written by the veteran Logan Mehl-Laituri
“...he brings all his concerns before God with the awareness that God will hear them. And God constantly hears him...He cannot turn down a single request of his. His prayer is good and full of love, and he does not have to lead himself into prayer or be led; his entire life is a prayer...Even his work for the Church is a labor of love, of love for God and for his neighbor. He occasionally suffers because of the Church...And he always imagines that the Lord suffers much more...(And what is his death like?) I see anxieties regarding death. And afterward, in the midst of dying, perfect surrender...”
Adrienne von Speyr page 226
The Book of All Saints
Every year I have a desire to begin Advent earlier, and I usually pick St Albert’s day which is 40 days to Christmas, November 15. But I always feel Martin sounds the joyful bell on his feast; that Christ is coming to be born inside us again and again. I have a special love for St Martin, which goes back to childhood seeing paintings of him clothing the beggar, and now buying the candles of him at the grocery store where he is called “San Martin Caballero.”
I bought some today to give as gifts. Each saint has a gift for you if you simply look into their lives. Many even teach us with their faults as well as their virtues.
Dear St Martin,
Teach us, like our friend, St Philippine Duchesne, to live in a prayer. So that our requests out of love for anyone we pray for, like St Martin, will be heard by You, dear Lord. That our simple love for You can ease the terrible suffering we see every day around us. And also, please, dear Lord, prepare an empty place within us, as St Therese of Lisieux once said, a manger, in our souls where the Infant King can be born-again.
Fr Bill McNichols
11 November 2019

Qua-kah-ka-num-ad- Woman Who Prays Always -St Rose Philippine Duchesne

December 23rd, 2019

Qua-kah-ka-num-ad- Woman Who Prays Always -St Rose Philippine Duchesne

“Qua-kah-ka-num-ad”:Woman Who Prays Always
St Rose Philippine Duchesne : 29 August 1769 + 18 November 1852
I don’t remember where I found the book “The Way of a Pilgrim.” Most probably in the once tiny, magical bookstore, The Tattered Cover, when it was housed in an almost fairytale-like house in Denver. I was just 24 and teaching high school art and theology at Regis high School. At that small bookstore I also found books on some of the greatest illustrators, like Edmund Dulac, Jesse Wilcox Smith, Arthur Rackham, and a Russian illustrator who would affect my two self-portraits, the masterful genius, Ivan Bilibin. Later, I would learn that Bilibin’s style of putting beautiful objects in little boxes around an illustration was taken directly from “talking icons” - that is icons with a saint in the center surrounded by little pictures of his or her life. This was actually the beginning of children’s books.
At that time in my life I dreamed of one day becoming an illustrator, and I too, like the young man in “The Way of a Pilgrim” was aching for a contemplative life that did not exclude loving others (or isolation), and enabled other artistic gifts of God to flourish (1 Corinthians 13). “The Way of a Pilgrim,” is described in one of its many editions as “This enduring work of Russian Spirituality first published in 1884, has charmed countless people with its tale of a nineteenth century peasant’s quest for the secret of prayer. Readers follow this anonymous Pilgrim as he treks across the Steppes of Russia in search of the answer to one compelling question. How does one pray constantly?” On the 18th of November we celebrate a woman who found a way.
Many years ago I was in St Louis for a meeting and I was invited by my now deceased classmate, Brother Tom Naughton, SJ to celebrate Mass for his community that evening, it was November 18. Because we were out all day I got to the community house right before Mass and went into the sacristy to become vested for Mass and to look at the Ordo of Prayer and Celebration of the Eucharist, sure there was not a major feastday. I was shocked that here was a woman who was a saint and the only one who’d ever lived in the area. I was humiliated that I knew nothing about her, though I had heard her name often from older Missouri Province Jesuits. This is what I found in the Ordo, literally minutes before I was to celebrate Mass:
“18 November, Rose Philippine Duchesne, + 1852 at age 83 at St Charles, Missouri; from Grenoble, France; founded the first American house of the religious of the Sacred Heart; opened the first American free school west of the Mississippi; known for her courage and desire to serve native Americans, especially the Potawatomi who called her Qua-kah-ka-num-ad, the ‘woman who prays always.’”
It was this designation that became a lifetime quest or deep desire, for me at that moment. The story goes that some Native Potawatomi men saw Philippine kneeling in prayer so they put an oak leaf on the back of her dress, and came back hours later, and it was still, unmoved on the back of her (habit) dress. The next day I asked Tom to drive us to her shrine so I could ask of her, to intercede for me, that one day, I would be granted her gift of praying always. For me I cannot think of any better gift, and I’m still praying for that gift to Philippine. To be in a prayer always, means for me,to live in love of God. To be in conversation with God, as much as possible and I have met many people who feel a longing or call to this way of living. They are all different, some married, some single... the call from God doesn’t seem to discriminate in any way. November has always been my favorite month, because I love the bone dry muted colors of all of nature, and right near the middle of this beautiful month of thanksgiving, we have this incredible woman to celebrate. A blessed coming November!
“And I will give you the treasures of darkness and hidden riches of secret places,that you may know that it is I, the Lord, the God of Israel, Who calls you by your name.” Isaiah 45:3
Fr William Hart McNichols

Our Lady of the Rosary - 7 October 2019

December 23rd, 2019

Our Lady of the Rosary - 7 October 2019

Our Lady of the Rosary : 7 October 2019
I remember very clearly a story our novice master told us seminarians in 1968, about his Mother and the Rosary. He admitted to us that he was critical of his Mother because she only used the Rosary for prayer. He wanted to teach her meditation with the scriptures and she politely submitted to her son just to make him happy. It was not going well, she missed her former way of praying and when he saw how deep into meditation, the Rosary took her, he was awed and also ashamed that he never really listened to her or watched her pray. There are so many, almost infinite ways to pray, especially for Catholics. Some pray only with the scriptures, some play their own music, or listen to others music or audio books in the car. Some make use of artistic contemplative creations like icons, paintings or statues. Also some find that nature brings them immediately into God’s presence, I remember my students in Denver telling me that, and I remember my students in Boston telling me they prayed on the subway with a book, or just noticing the suffering of others. Many read spiritual books like the life of a saint, and once again, there are an endless variety of saints to choose from. And...some pray with the Rosary. My kindergarten teacher, a Precious Blood Sister from Dayton, Ohio, taught us the Rosary in its most simple form. Then my Mother helped me learn what Sister had taught us, so I too, naturally associate the Rosary with Mom. I try to begin my prayer every day with the Rosary, then move into some scripture. Lately, I’ve been reading Isaiah using a great book to supplement my reading called “The Fifth Gospel: Isaiah in the History of Christianity” by John Sawyer. Before that I was deeply immersed in the Book of Job, for obvious reasons in our challenging times. I found a heartbreaking comparison with Psalm 139, where the psalmist finds God everywhere, with chapter 23 in Job, where he cannot find God anywhere. Job’s cruel yet theologically sophisticated “friends” taunt him with their dead speeches, and inability to actually minister to his or anyone’s suffering. I think we have all found people like this when we reach out while suffering. I love Job’s humble statement of faith to his wife, “Shall we accept only the good things from the hand of God and never anything bad ? So in all this, Job said nothing wrong.” (Job 2:10) But the two sides to anyone’s spiritual life are going to be going back and forth with darkness, nothingness, times of desolation and also times of illumination and feeling engulfed in God’s love. I think it was St. John of the Cross who said a good spiritual director is one in a thousand , then it was St Francis de Sales, who later added, no, one in ten thousand. These exaggerations make a sad point; that it’s rare to find someone to accompany you through darkness without blaming you, like the “friends” of Job, for it. It’s during all times, light or dark that I find the Rosary a most beautiful, and comforting way to pray. I pray at night to go to sleep, I pray often, while sleeping, and I wake up with the Rosary. In my humble opinion and experience, I simply offer it to you, whatever you may be going through. A most blessed feast of Our Lady of the Rosary!
Fr Bill McNichols
7 October 2019

The Name of God Adam Kadmon- Rosh Hashanah 2019

December 23rd, 2019

The Name of God Adam Kadmon- Rosh Hashanah 2019

The Name of God Adam Kadmon : Rosh Hashanah 2019
(There is a beautiful explanation of this holy fiery calligraphy of the Name of God, in John Dadosky’s book “Image to Insight : The Art of William Hart McNichols” from UNM Press 2018 available from Amazon)
“God will take us back in love
God will cover up our iniquities
You (God) will hurl all our sins
Into the depths of the sea.”
Micah 7:19
Around this time of year there are so many saints, Sts Therese ,Jerome, Francis, the three Archangels, the Guardian Angels... but I chose to focus on Rosh Hashanah. Since I first learned about this feast in New York in 1980, I have felt the High Holy Days (including Yom Kippur) are very shimmering and anointed days; just an aside, St Edith Stein was born on Yom Kippur, October 12, 1891. This year Rosh Hashanah begins at sunset September 29, and Yom Kippur begins at sunset October 8. I love the idea of beginning a new year in Autumn, and also the added notion that we look back on the year 2019 and become honestly aware of our failings (very similar to the idea of the St Ignatius’ daily Examen) and “ throw into the depths of the sea” all our faults and sins. As Holy Prophet Micah prophesied “God will take us back in love and cover all our iniquities.” I have asked my sister Marjory McNichols Wilson ( oh, and please look at her gorgeous paintings on her website !) to post this, as she always does, and a link to the meaning of Rosh Hashanah.
A blessed and holy new year “ in God in whom we live and move and have our very being !” (From Sunday preface number 6)
Fr Bill McNichols
Rosh Hashanah 2019

The Birthday of Mary Mother of God

December 23rd, 2019

The Birthday of Mary Mother of God

The Birthday of Mary Mother of God
(The Hortus Conclusus : The Enclosed Garden)
“She is a garden enclosed, my sister, my promised bride, a garden enclosed, a sealed fountain...Fountain of the garden, well of living water, streams flowing down from Lebanon!
Beloved: awake, north wind, come, wind of the south! Breathe over my garden, to spread its sweet smell around. Let my love come into his garden,let him taste it’s most exquisite fruits.
Lover: I come into my garden, my sister my promised Bride...
Beloved: I sleep, but my heart is awake...”
Song of Songs taken from chapters 4 and 5
“O lovely sprout full of greening power
from the stem of Jesse,
what a great event is this:
As the eagle lifts its eyes
to the sun,
so the divine glance
fell on the most beautiful of women
When the Father from heaven,
O Virgin,
looked into your purity
and his Word became
flesh in you.
Your virginal heart was enlightened
in mystical ways by God’s mystery
and wondrous bloomed from you,
O Virgin, a bright flower.
Praise be to God the Father,
the Son and the Holy Spirit!
St Hildegard of Bingen Doctor of the Bride : The Church
“Behold the Father is his daughter’s son;
The bird that built the nest is
hatched therein.
Might feeble is and force
doth faintly creep...”
Holy Martyr St Robert Southwell
Happy Birthday dear Mary Mother of God and our Mother !
Fr Bill McNichols 8 September 2019

Feast of the Queenship of Mary Mother of God

December 23rd, 2019

Feast of the Queenship of Mary Mother of God

Feast of the Queenship of Mary Mother of God
“I choose the little ones and the weak...” these are words spoken to Estelle Faguette, during the apparitions of Pellevoisin, in November 1876 by the Mother of God.
For me they echo her Son, in the Gospel of St Luke, and the whole living concept and reality of the kingdom of God. The kingdom is mentioned 4 times in Matthew, 14 times in Mark, 32 times in Luke and 2 times in John . During my early 30’s I was very interested in the depth and meaning of the kingdom. What is the kingdom to Jesus and who is allowed in to be a part of it ? GB Caird said words in his book on Luke I will never forget... the only requirement for admission into the kingdom is an emptiness only God can fill.
When I was an art student at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn from 1980-83, I found the most beautiful and scholarly commentary on Luke by the late, GB Caird. I would read it on the subway, not knowing that this commentary, as well as Caird’s commentary on Revelation, would form my spiritual life then and all through the 80’s when I began my ministry of working, and to use Pope Francis’ beautiful words, “accompanying people” with HIV-AIDS. There are some books, like The Revelations of Julian of Norwich, and Caird’s book on Luke that are so beautifully written, and so hope-filled that I find myself returning to them over and over.
“The reign or kingdom of God still has for Luke a future aspect for which men must continue to pray. But the fact that matters, the fact that constitutes the good news of the gospel, is that the kingdom has already arrived...Indeed, his entire Gospel is a commentary on this theme. All his tenderness of heart and mastery of description are called into play as he presents to us a cavalcade of witnesses who can testify to the presence of the kingdom because they have discovered in Jesus the friend and champion of the sick, the poor, the penitent, the outcast, of women, Samaritans, and Gentiles.”
St Luke by G.B. Caird
“The rescue of the outcast” pages 36,37
O Mary, Queen of the kingdom of God and Queen of the Universe,
Teach us the way through the “narrow gate” mentioned by St Luke in his story of your Son. A way of love, and finally forgiveness, of ourselves and others as we live this brief life longing to be with you and your Son forever in the kingdom of God. And which because of your Son, we feel, we know, has already begun and broken through all this present darkness, especially today, on your feast.
“Hail Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life our sweetness, and our hope...despise not our petitions, but in thy clemency, hear and answer us.”
Amen
22 August 2019
Fr Bill McNichols
Amen

 

Displaying: 1 - 10 of 113

  |  

Show All

  |

[1]

2 3 4 5 6 Next